Tag Archives: Cubby Broccoli

Bond,James Bond PT3: Q Desmond Llewelyn

7 Apr


“Yes, I know Q is beloved,” Desmond said. “But for God’s sake, don’t make him some kind of sentimental grandfather — that’s what I am in real life.”

Desmond Llewelyn, as the iconic Q, the gadget master in 17 Bond films, supplied 007 with everything from a BMW with a rocket launching sun roof to lethal umbrellas and toxic fountain pens. Llewelyn always played the tolerant father to his child, 007, when it came to giving him the keys to the car. “007 you will bring the car back in pristine condition, won’t you? Or Grow-Up won’t you 007?!”

Llewelyn in his real life adventures was no stranger to dangerous adventures.  In the early days of WWII, he was serving in France with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers holding off a Panzer division. The battle lasted for 2 days, as Llewelyn and his mates tried to secure the perimeter of a canal.

When things went sour, Llewelyn swam to the other side of the canal hoping the British were there. “Unfortunately the Germans were,” he says. The Welsh-bom Llewelyn ended up a prisoner of war for 5 years — to the day — in camps like Rottenburg, Laufen, and Warburg.

He says he harbors no ill will against the Germans, though there were 118 officers crowded into the room at his 1st internment.

It never occurred to him, to try acting until, after the war he went to work as a scene shifter with an amateur theater group.

“I used to share study with actor Dennis Price. He said, ‘Why don’t you come and act?’ I said, ‘I don’t want to.’ Finally he persuaded me. And I got bitten by the bug and managed to persuade my family.”

It was simply by chance that he was cast as Q. “I did small parts in TV and films. I did one film about the liberation of Paris which was directed by Terence Young. Terence was to direct Dr. No, luckily for me, the man who played Q in that wasn’t available. And when my name came up, Terence said yes.”

Llewelyn likes playing Q which he’s did for 17 of the films, though his parts are usually small.

“It’s jolly nice,” he said. “I always complain. It’s difficult in a way. I’m treated as a star and I don’t get a star’s salary. They’re extremely generous. I get paid extremely well for my one or 2 days’ work. But I’m always plugging away and next time maybe I can get a larger part.”

In real life Llewelyn was a techno novice. As far as gadgets he said, “I can’t work them at all, I can’t even work the cash machine at the bank.”

Roger Moore, former Bond star says of Llewelyn, “I was the bane of his life. He had to say probably the worst gobbledegook that any actor could be asked to perform. “He had technical words to say that never seemed to make any sense.”

Moore revealed how he used to tease Llewelyn by rewriting his lines on the prompt boards, to make him say silly things.”He was a wonderful man to work with,” said Moore. “He had a wonderful sense of humor.” Moore goes on to say, “No Bond film was complete without Q and his gadgets. “I would go further and say I do not think a Bond film would be complete without Desmond Llewelyn.”

At age 85, Llewelyn was in a fatal car accident on December 19, 1999, as he was returning home from a book signing event. Despite attention from a doctor called to scene and transfer by helicopter to Eastbourne District General Hospital he died shortly thereafter.



Bond, James Bond PT2: Maurice Binder

7 Apr



Maurice Binder (August 25, 1925 – April 4, 1991) was a film title designer best known for his work on 14 James Bond films including the first, Dr. No, in 1962 and for Stanley Donen’s films from 1958. He was born in New York City, but mostly worked in England from the 1950s onwards. The Bond producers first approached him after being impressed by his title designs for the 1960 Stanley Donen comedy film The Grass is Greener. He also worked with Stanley Donen in Charade and Arabesque, both with music of Henri Mancini (Pink Panther).

Binder created the signature gun barrel sequence for the opening titles of the first Bond film, Dr. No, in 1962. Binder originally planned to employ a camera sighted down the barrel of a .38 caliber gun, but this caused some problems. Unable to stop down the lens of a standard camera enough to bring the entire gun barrel into focus, Binder created a pinhole camera to solve the problem and the barrel became crystal clear. Binder described the genesis of the gun barrel sequence in the last interview he recorded before his death in 1991:

“That was something I did in a hurry, because I had to get to a meeting with the producers in twenty minutes. I just happened to have little white, price tag stickers and I thought I’d use them as gun shots across the screen. We’d have James Bond walk through and fire, at which point blood comes down onscreen. That was about a twenty-minute storyboard I did, and they said, This looks great!”

At least one critic has also observed that the sequence recalls the gun fired at the audience at the end of  The Great train Robbery (1903)

Binder is also best known for women performing a variety of activities such as dancing, jumping on a trampoline, or shooting weapons. Both sequences are trademarks and staples of the James Bond films. Maurice Binder was succeeded by Daniel Kleinman as the title designer for 1995’s Golden Eye.

Prior to Golden Eye, the only James Bond movies for which he did not create the opening title credits were From Russia with Love (1963) and Goldfinger (1964), both of which were designed by RobertBrownjohn.

Binder shot opening and closing sequences involving a mouse for The Mouse That Roared (1959), a sequence of monks filmed as a mosaic explaining the history of the Golden Bell in The Long Ships (1963), and a sequence of Spanish dancers explaining why the then topical reference of nuclear weapons vanishing in a B-52 mishap shifted from Spain to Greece in The Day the Fish came Out. He designed the title sequence for Sodom and Gomorrah (1963) that featured an orgy (the only one in the film). He took three days to direct the sequence that was originally supposed to take one day.

Binder also was a producer of The Passage (1979), and a visual consultant on Dracula (1979) and Oxford Blues (1984).

Binder’s visual style and eroticism has made an indelible mark on Bond Films. His work was more organic in the way movement was portrayed, as opposed to the CGI look of later Bond films. Binder’s creative genius gave us the flavor and mood of the story that was about to unfold before us.

Binder, who never married, but loved his career, photography and women, died of lung cancer in London at 65 years of age.


Bond, James Bond PT 1: Albert (Cubby) Broccoli

7 Apr



On the Bond movie formula: “A virile and resourceful hero, exotic locations, the ingenious apparatus of espionage and sex on a fairly sophisticated level.”

In the first of a series concerning itself with the Bond franchise, the following is a broad overview of legendary film producer Cubby Broccoli. The 22 Bond films based on the books by Ian Fleming and produced by the Broccoli’s, has become the most enduring and profitable franchise in cinema history.

Albert R. “Cubby” Broccoli was born in the borough of , Queens, New York, the younger of two children of immigrants from the Calabria, region of Italy, Giovanni Broccoli and Christina Vence. He acquired his nickname after his cousin, Pasquale “Pat” DiCicco, began calling him “Kabibble,” eventually shortened to “Kubbie” and adopted by Broccoli as “Cubby.” The family later bought a farm in Smithtown, New York, on long Island, near their relatives the DiCiccos.


During his early period in Hollywood, Broccoli may have taken part in a bar-room brawl which took the life of comedian Ted Healy. According to E. J. Fleming’s book The Fixers, Broccoli, his cousin, gangster Pasquale “Pat” DiCicco, and film star Wallace Beery, fought with Healy and beat him to death. Fleming asserts that MGM executives Eddie Mannix and Howard Strickling, in an attempt to save the reputation of their star Beery, fabricated a story about college students attacking Healy, immediately followed by a four-month trip to Europe for Beery. Immigration records confirm a four-month trip to Europe on Beery’s part immediately after Healy’s death, ending 17 April 1938.

At the beginning of the 1950s, Broccoli moved once more, this time to London, where the British Government provided subsidies to film productions made in the UK with British casts and crews. Together with Irving Allen, Broccoli formed Warwick Films that made a prolific and successful series of films for Columbia Pictures.

When Broccoli became interested in bringing Ian Fleming’s, James Bond character into features, he discovered that the rights already belonged to the Canadian producer Harry Saltzman, who had long wanted to break into film, and who had produced several stage plays and films with only modest success. When the two were introduced by a mutual friend, screenwriter Wolf Mankowitz, Saltzman refused to sell the rights, but agreed to partner with Broccoli and co-produce the films, which led to the creation of the production company EON Productions and its parent (holding) company Danjag, LLC named after their wives’ first names, Dana and Jacqueline.

Saltzman and Broccoli produced the first Bond movie, Dr. No, in 1962. Their second, From Russia with Love, was a break-out success and from then on, the films grew in cost, action, and ambition. With larger casts, more difficult stunts and special effects, and a continued dependence on exotic locations, the franchise became essentially a full-time job. In 1966, Albert was in Japan with other producers scouting locations to film the next James Bond film You Only Live Twice, Albert had a ticket booked on BOAC flight 911. He cancelled his ticket on that day so he could see a ninja demonstration. Flight 911 crashed after clear air turbulence.

Broccoli made one notable attempt at a non-Bond film, an adaptation of Ian Fleming’s Chitty Chitty Bang Bang in 1968, and due to legal wrangling over the rights to story elements, ceded producer credit on Thunderball to Kevin McClory. By the mid-1960s, Broccoli had put nearly all of his energies into the Bond series. Saltzman’s interests continued to range apart from the series, including production of a loose trilogy of spy films based on Len Deighton’s, Harry Palmer, a character who operates in a parallel universe to Bond, with all the danger but none of the glamour and gadgets.

Saltzman and Broccoli had differences over Saltzman’s outside commitments, but in the end it was Saltzman who withdrew from Danjaq and EON after a series of financial mishaps. While Saltzman’s departure brought the franchise a step closer to corporate control, Broccoli lost relatively little independence or prestige in the bargain. From then until his death, the racy credits sequence to every EON Bond film would begin with the words “Albert R. Broccoli Presents.” Although from the 1970s onward the films became lighter in tone and looser in plot, at times less successful with critics, the series distinguished itself in production values and continued to appeal to audiences.

In 1981, Broccoli was honoured with the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award for his work in film; the award was presented at the 1982 Academy Awards ceremony by the current James Bond at that time, Roger Moore. Broccoli also has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame as Cubby Broccoli.

Broccoli married three times. In 1940, at the age of 31, he married actress Gloria Blondell (the younger sister of actress, Joan Blondell); they later divorced amicably in 1945 without having had children. In 1951, he married Nedra Clark, and the couple were told they had fertility problems and would never have children. They adopted a son, Tony Broccoli, after which Nedra became pregnant. She died in 1958, soon after giving birth to their daughter, Tina Broccoli. At the time of Nedra’s illness, while nursing her in America, Albert Broccoli became convinced that Bond would make a good movie series, and set up a meeting between Ian Fleming and his partner in London.

In 1959, Broccoli married actress and novelist Dana Wilson (née Dana Natol) (1922 – 29 February 2004). They had a daughter together, Barbara Broccoli, and Albert Broccoli became a mentor to Dana’s teenage son, Michael G. Wilson. Broccoli insisted on keeping his family close to him when possible. Consequently the children grew up around the Bond film sets, and his wife’s influence on various production decisions is alluded to in many informal accounts.

Michael Wilson worked his way up through the production company to co-write and co-produce. Barbara Broccoli, in her turn, served in several capacities under her father’s tutelage from the 1980s on. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli have co-produced the films since the elder Broccoli’s death.

Dana Broccoli died of cancer in 2004, aged 82. The end of Tomorrow Never Dies, displays the dedication “In loving memory of Albert R. (Cubby) Broccoli”.



9 Nov

Synopsis:   Bond: Everyone should have a hobby. Silva: What’s yours?  Bond: Mine is resurrection.

Bond’s loyalty to M is tested as her past comes back to haunt her. As MI6 comes under attack, 007 must track down and destroy the threat, no matter how personal the cost.


Daniel Craig………………………………….Bond, James Bond

Judy Dench…………………………………………………………M

Javier Bardem………………………………………………….Silva

Ralph Fiennes…………………………………..Gareth Mallory

Naomie Harris……………………………………………………Eve

Bernice Marlohe………………………………………….Severine

Albert Finney………………………………………………Kincaide

Ben Whishaw…………………………………………………………Q

Helen McCrorey……………………………………….Clair Dowar

Nicholas Woodson…………………………………………..Dr. Hall

Review: Bond is back in his 23rd outing and better than ever. Sam Mendes has directed what is possibly the best Bond film in the franchise. This tightly knit thriller, starring Daniel Craig in his third Bond film, tells the story of a vendetta against M, played by a brilliant Judy Dench. The story opens not with the typical camera iris but instead right in the middle of the action. The screen is unfocused and suddenly the shadow of Bond appears walking forward and into focus. Bond is chasing after his enemy, in Budapest, who has stolen a hard drive from MI6 agents. The hard drive contains all the names and covers for all the MI6 agents world wide. M is following Bond from headquarters through the use of satellite and we see Bond with an ear gadget listening to M as she gives orders as to what to do.  Helping Bond is agent Eve, played by Naomie Harris . After a thrilling chase through a marketplace, many fruit stands turned upside down, Bond finds himself atop a train fighting with the guy who has the hard drive on a chain around his neck. Eve, in a jeep, catches up with the train before it enters a tunnel and has one chance to shoot the guy. She tells M that she may shoot Bond, Bond is literally holding the guy by his neck. She only has a second before the train enters a tunnel, M tells her to shoot the bloody gun, she does, Bond, shot, falls from the train.  Cut to M writing Bond’s obituary.

The title sequence that follows is a feast for the eyes and as with any Bond film outdoes the previous versions. The cornucopia of images of Bond and naked “Bond Girls” tells a chilling story of Bond’s death and resurrection.

The Prime Minister of England is unhappy with M and wants her replaced. Ralph Fiennes plays Gareth Mallory, the man  sent by the Prime Minister to oversee M’s retirement and transition. She will have nothing to do with it until she finds out who stole the hard drive and she gets it back. Who ever stole it, hacks into MI6’s computer network, sends M encrypted messages and blows up M’s office at MI6 Headquarters. M standing in front of the flag draped coffins of her colleagues swear she will find out who did this.

Bond, who is not dead, a has been cavorting on some Caribbean Island. When he hears the news of MI6 headquarters being hit, he returns to England and hides in M’s apartment. She finds him there and asks: “James what took you so long?”  Bond finds his world turned upside down as he comes back to MI6 and must compete with younger agents, Q is a 20 something geek, gadgets like exploding pens are considered dinosaurs, and a Prime Minister who feels the old school spy game needs to be eliminated.

Javier Bardem plays the villain Silva, he is not over the top but creepy from the inside out. His character is demented and psychologically damaged, and wants M dead. He is one of the most convincingly real villains in the Bond franchise.

So who is Silva and why does he want to kill M?  What is SKYFALL and how does it relate to Bond?  Will there be a transition of power at MI6?  What about the hard-drive?

There are plenty tips of the hat to the entire Bond series, musical cues, Q’s new take on old gadgets, the old gun in the headlights, Aston Martin makes a cameo much to the pleasure of the audience, we find there is a new Moneypenny in a very clever way and finally the camera iris dripping blood at the end credits.  The film takes us full circle.  Daniel Craig has finally made the Bond character his own, and it is exciting to watch him go from gruff and unshaven to suave and witty.  I would be less than honest if I didn’t say that is among the best films of the year. Look for the Martini being shaken……